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#MyCurtsyStyle Selling with Curtsy

Meet our Sellers! 💃🏼✨💸

It’s ✨Seller Week✨ here at Curtsy! This week, we are celebrating YOU, our wonderful community and celebrating how our amazing empowered gals are using Curtsy. Whether you’ve never sold before or have sold hundreds and thousands of items, we’re listing tips in the app & on our Instagram for some inspo. Stay tuned! But while you’re here, meet some of our amazing sellers:

<strong>Alex Kuchenbuch</strong>
Alex Kuchenbuch

💸 My Curtsy earnings: Over $15K!
💖 What I love about the Curtsy community: that everyone is so friendly & has a love for sustainable shopping just like me. My favorite thing about selling on Curtsy is I get to make relationships with people all around the country, which is something I never thought I would be able to do. 
🔥 Pro tips: I’ve had the most success selling items that are NWT (New With Tags) as well as trendy brands and clothing. 

PS. The Cardigan in my pic was a vintage find on Cursty! 🙌

<strong>Elyse Littleton</strong>
Elyse Littleton

💸 My Curtsy earnings: Over $1,600!
💖 What I love about the Curtsy community: I love connecting with members of the Curtsy community! Curtsy makes it so easy to meet other sellers and buyers by allowing an Instagram tab on your profile. Curtsy also has a super fun following on their Instagram, so you can connect with other girls who have similar styles as you, which also simplifies the buying/selling process! 
🔥 Pro tips: I’ve had really great success selling purses I no longer wear, as well as my old prom dresses! 

PS. I sold this cute set I’m wearing in my pic on Curtsy for $30!

<strong>Jordan Nagel</strong>
Jordan Nagel

💸 My Curtsy earnings: Over $2K!
💖 What I love about Curtsy: it’s so easy to buy and sell. You can modify filters and settings so that all clothes that pop up ate your style. Can be good or bad for my bank account! 
🔥 Pro tips: I have the most success selling things don’t go out of style such as sweatpants, sweatshirts, or anything name brand.

<strong>Jessica Morgan</strong>
Jessica Morgan

💸 My Curtsy earnings: about $2,000
💖 What I love about Curtsy: So easy to navigate compared to other platforms. Customer service is always helpful & quick to respond. Items are purchased quickly on the app since there’s people actively looking to buy.
🔥 Pro tips: Sweaters, sweatpants, & athletic clothes have been selling well

<strong>Lily Swantek</strong>
Lily Swantek

💸 My Curtsy earnings: roughly $1,800
💖 What I love about Curtsy: the low seller fees & ease of shipment process. My favorite thing about the community is the already close-knit bond between the social media team and us stylists — it truly is a strong community of like-minded people!
🔥 Pro tips: I’ve sold a ton of Urban Outfitters and Free People, which I’ve been able to take my earnings and “trade” them in for new pieces for myself! My style is ever evolving, so it’s refreshing to see my old pieces being sold to a new home in exchange for new pieces!

<strong>Jensen Hodecker</strong>
Jensen Hodecker

💸 My Curtsy earnings: roughly $1,100
💖 What I love about Curtsy: how user friendly it is. It is laid out in the best way possible to maximize both selling and buying. Even when I did have questions at first when I started out Curtsy support was always there to help
🔥 Pro tips: Popular brands such as Zara, Princess Polly, Urban Outfitters, etc. 

PS. I was obsessed with this Sunday Muse set I got off Curtsy! I even wore it to my 21st birthday trip to Nashville.

<strong>Carley Mittag</strong>
Carley Mittag

💸 My Curtsy earnings: about $1,300
💖 What I love about Curtsy: First off, it’s so easy to do. I love taking pictures of my items and I like to have a variety of pictures. I think about what picture I would want to see if I was buying it. I also love that it suggests a price based on the item. I love the Curtsy community, all the girls on their are so nice and helpful!!
🔥 Pro tips: Popular brands such as Zara, Princess Polly, Urban Outfitters, etc. 

We’ll be adding more Curtsy sellers throughout this week & beyond. 😻


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Categories
#CurtsyCares CurtsyCelebrates Trending

Celebrating Juneteenth Today & Everyday

Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. Styles and cultures have been taken away from Black people for decades to be reclaimed as something more “trendy” or “appropriate.” There is a double standard between POC and white people when it comes to the fashion industry. Microaggressions frequently bash Black people for wearing the styles that they originated. Appreciating the culture rather than appropriating it comes with advocating for Black lives.

Like many trends, the bucket hat was initially invented purely for function. Often referred to as a “fishing hat”, bucket hats were first introduced in the 1900s to protect farmers and fishermen from the rain. It wasn’t until the 1960s that the bucket hat would be adopted as a high fashion item. In the 1980s, the hat became popular with rappers and remained a staple of street fashion into the 1990s. More recently, it has re-emerged as a fashion catwalk item after being sported by celebrities such as Rihanna and Megan Thee Stallion.

One of the latest trends ruling Pinterest, creative acrylic nails are everywhere. However, as decorative nail art enters the mainstream, Black women are being left out of the conversation that they started. Acrylic nails are still frequently labelled as ‘trashy’, ‘cheap’ and ‘ghetto’ when worn by a black woman. It’s important to be respectful as a non-POC when choosing to wear nails and to change the rhetoric to give credit where credit is due.

While branding first played a role in fashion as a way to showcase class and status, it soon became an aesthetic look that many still know and love today. In the ‘80s, designer Daniel Day, better known as Dapper Dan, began dressing hip-hop’s top artists by reengineering these luxury logos in a bold and flashy way. Dapper Dan helped start a resurgence in creativity in the fashion industry.

The hoop earring has evolved into an essential fashion accessory, and the staple of anyone’s jewelry collection. Black women have brought hoop earrings into the mainstream and have sustained their popularity for decades. In the 60s and 70s, hoops were a way to embrace Afro-Centric styles. We can see these iconic earring on some of the most influential celebrities such as Diana Ross and Maya Angelou.

After the past year of staying at home, baggy clothes have become all the rave, and will still be my go-to fashion choice post covid. Skinny jeans are out, and straight-leg mom jeans are in. The origins of the oversized clothing trend dates back to the ’80s hip hop era, and stems from black communities and families, as well as financial hardships. Larger clothing was passed down to younger family members from older family members to save money. Baggy clothing is a comfortable trend for all shapes and sizes.

Often called “sneaker heads”, the community made up of people with a deep love for sneakers first became popularized in the 1970s and 80s with sneakers made famous by hip hop starts and athletes. Sneaker culture and collecting unique, limited edition, and flashy sneakers became a hobby and identity for many. Basketball icon Michael Jordan released his “Nike Air Jordans” in 1985, and these shoes are often seen as the first step to becoming a sneakerhead. The resale of these rare and exclusive sneaker has become an industry in it of itself, as we see in GOAT and Stockx.

When we think of tracksuits today, I often think of the bright red tracksuit Sue Sylvester wore every day in the TV series Glee. However, Baby Phat walked so Sue Sylvester could run. Initially named “Phat Fashions, Kimora Lee Simmons launched her tracksuit empire in 1999. This street style became a fashion essential due to its comfortability and iconic look. Rappers like Jay-Z also skyrocketed the tracksuit trend into popularity when it became a symbol of wealth, that you didn’t need to “sweat the small stuff such as getting dressed”- that a tracksuit was fashionable enough. 

Head-wraps and silk headscarves are ruling the summer trends this season. And there’s no question why – whether it’s to look luxurious or conceal a bad hair day, silk headscarves can make an outfit. It is however important to recognize the origin of this trend and what it represents. Born into slavery, reclaimed by Black women, the headwrap is now a celebrated in the fashion industry to express style and identity.

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SOURCES:
https://missionmag.org/the-rise-and-fall-of-logomania/
https://hellogiggles.com/beauty/nails/acrylic-nails-appropriation/
https://www.crfashionbook.com/fashion/a21967443/history-of-bucket-hat-fashion/
https://zenerations.org/2020/07/26/7-fashion-trends-that-originated-from-black-culture/ https://www.naturallycurly.com/curlreading/hairstyles/the-history-of-headwraps-then-there-and-now https://thetempest.co/2020/06/30/style/a-close-look-at-5-fashion-trends-started-by-black-people/ https://news.ncsu.edu/2021/02/sneakerheads-not-hypebeasts-defining-a-sneaker-driven-sub-culture/